Poetic Names for June

01 Jun Poetic Names for June

It’s already June! Here, I have compiled a list of poetic names and their descriptions typical of June. I list poetic names by early, mid-, and late each month, but all these timings are relative, so you should use your judgment to determine whatever feels right for the day.

Seasons vary based on where you are. For example, I grew up in the most northern part of Japan. Japan’s academic year runs from April to March, so we graduate in March and typically school starts in April. As a kid, whenever I attended graduation ceremonies in March or commencement ceremonies in April, it was usually snowing hard outside. But all those mayors or famous people started their speeches by talking about budding cherry blossoms or warm spring weather. I always wondered how they could see those things that I couldn’t see (it’s snowing… I only see icicles on cherry trees?!) Now I know, of course, that those speechmakers were really just beginning their speeches with what they were supposed to talk about in March or April, not necessarily what was actually happening in Hokkaido.

When it comes to Chado and hosting a tea ceremony, it may not be appropriate to talk about a warm sunny day if you are having a blizzard outside. Like other events and festivals, holding a tea ceremony is time- and theme-specific, so you should be mindful when you select a poetic name (or a tea utensil with a poetic name).

Early June

  • Ajisai (紫陽花)-Hydrangea
  • Hotaru (蛍)-Firefly
  • Yana (梁)-Kiddle, fishing weir
  • U(‘oo’) ka’i (鵜飼)-Cormorant fishing

Mid-June

  • Tsuyu kusa (露草)-Asiatic dayflower
  • Sensei (泉声)-Sound of a stream
  • Ashi (芦)-Reeds (often used for thatched roofs in Japan)
  • A’o Ume (青梅)-Green plum fruit

Late June

  • Ta u-e (田植)-Rice planting

*The next three may be used only up to or around 6/30 because the summer purification rite ritual is typically performed on June 30th.

  • Nagoshi (夏越)-Summer purification rites
  • Himuro (氷室)-Ice room
  • Chi no wa (茅の輪)-Cogon grass ring (through which people pass during summer purification rites)
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