UP Tea Blog

  • Learning Chado (1): Audrey Tuckerman

    ‘Learning tea’ is probably a foreign concept for most Americans, so we are going to invite our tea school members to write/talk about Chado and learning tea. We start the series with Audrey Tuckerman, a student at Shofuso Japanese Garden. -When did you start to take tea ceremony lesson? Why, or what made you get interested in Chado? I started learning tea ceremony about three years ago.  I became interested because I have always had an interest in all sorts of tea cultures from around the world.  My friend, Ai, took me to a tea ceremony in Japan and it......

  • Poetic names to use in April

    We often use poetic names in Chado, commonly as a name of Chashaku. We are going to list several names for each month. The poetic names usually precede the actual time/event. For example, you will see names related to the Boy’s Festival (which is May 5th) at the end of April. Early April Yamazakura(山桜) – Natural/indigenous cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms in mountains Hana matsuri(花祭り)- Cherry blossom festivals Wakatake(若竹)- Young bamboos Hana gasumi(花霞)- Cherry blossoms in full bloom and look like haze from afar Mid-April Osozakura(遅桜)- Late cherry blossoms Yozakura(夜桜)- Cherry blossoms at night Hana bie(花冷)- Cold days in spring Hana......

  • Mei-Poetic names in May (no pun intended)

    It’s almost May, so here goes the list of poetic names for May. Hope you can use a few of them at Okeiko. Early May A(h-)oba (青葉)- Fresh/young green leaves Seitai(青苔)- Moss, which is especially fresh green Kumpu(薫風)- Early summer breeze, balmy breeze Satsu Satsu (颯々)- Rustling of the wind; the sound of rushing wind Mid-May Samidare(五月雨)- Early summer rain (which tends to be long-lasting) Kaki tsubata (杜若)- An iris Sa Otome (早乙女)- Women/girls who plant rice seedlings (religious symbol for rich harvest in the fall; typically dressed in a navy blue dress, red strap and a straw hat) Cho sei(澄声) –......

  • Poetic Names for June

    It’s already June! Here, I have compiled a list of poetic names and their descriptions typical of June. I list poetic names by early, mid-, and late each month, but all these timings are relative, so you should use your judgment to determine whatever feels right for the day. Seasons vary based on where you are. For example, I grew up in the most northern part of Japan. Japan’s academic year runs from April to March, so we graduate in March and typically school starts in April. As a kid, whenever I attended graduation ceremonies in March or commencement ceremonies......

  • Mei-Poetic Names (July)

    It is already July, so here is the list of poetic names typical for July. Early July * The first three are related to Tanabata, a festival celebrated on July 7th which has roots in the Chinese star festival (the Qixi festival). It is said that the lovers across the Milky Way can meet once a year if it does not rain. People (kids) write their wishes on paper strips and hang them on bamboos. Ama no Kawa (天の川)-Milky Way (up to July 7th) Oh se (逢瀬)- A tryst (up to July 7th) Ginga (銀河)-Galaxy Uchiwa (団扇)-A round paper fan......