UP Tea Blog

  • Learning Chado (1): Audrey Tuckerman

    ‘Learning tea’ is probably a foreign concept for most Americans, so we are going to invite our tea school members to write/talk about Chado and learning tea. We start the series with Audrey Tuckerman, a student at Shofuso Japanese Garden. -When did you start to take tea ceremony lesson? Why, or what made you get interested in Chado? I started learning tea ceremony about three years ago.  I became interested because I have always had an interest in all sorts of tea cultures from around the world.  My friend, Ai, took me to a tea ceremony in Japan and it......

  • Poetic names to use in April

    We often use poetic names in Chado, commonly as a name of Chashaku. We are going to list several names for each month. The poetic names usually precede the actual time/event. For example, you will see names related to the Boy’s Festival (which is May 5th) at the end of April. Early April Yamazakura(山桜) – Natural/indigenous cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms in mountains Hana matsuri(花祭り)- Cherry blossom festivals Wakatake(若竹)- Young bamboos Hana gasumi(花霞)- Cherry blossoms in full bloom and look like haze from afar Mid-April Osozakura(遅桜)- Late cherry blossoms Yozakura(夜桜)- Cherry blossoms at night Hana bie(花冷)- Cold days in spring Hana......

  • Mei-Poetic names in May (no pun intended)

    It’s almost May, so here goes the list of poetic names for May. Hope you can use a few of them at Okeiko. Early May A(h-)oba (青葉)- Fresh/young green leaves Seitai(青苔)- Moss, which is especially fresh green Kumpu(薫風)- Early summer breeze, balmy breeze Satsu Satsu (颯々)- Rustling of the wind; the sound of rushing wind Mid-May Samidare(五月雨)- Early summer rain (which tends to be long-lasting) Kaki tsubata (杜若)- An iris Sa Otome (早乙女)- Women/girls who plant rice seedlings (religious symbol for rich harvest in the fall; typically dressed in a navy blue dress, red strap and a straw hat) Cho sei(澄声) –......